Folding Flat Diapers: The Origami Fold

Folding Flat Diapers: The Origami Fold

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Just over a week ago I introduced my first flat diaper fold tutorial. That was for the airplane flat fold which is a great fold for boys as it puts lots of layers right up front where boys need it most. Today, I want to introduce the origami flat fold. The origami flat fold works great for boys and girls as it places the most layers right through the centre of the diaper (equally front to back). I find that it leaves me with lots of length in the wings of the diaper for wrapping around a pudgy baby. If you’re doing the fold on a smaller/skinnier baby, you can fold those wings back a bit to shorten them up. Don’t be intimidated by the name of this fold! I promise it’s way easier than folding an origami paper crane! For this tutorial I’m using the Geffen Baby Fladdle flat diaper again. If you’d like to purchase a Geffen Baby Fladdle, you can order directly from Geffen Baby or, if you’re in Canada, you can order from Lagoon BabyRead More


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AppleCheeks One Size Diaper? Oh Yes They Did! (+GIVEAWAY)

AppleCheeks One Size Diaper? Oh Yes They Did!

I received this item at no cost in order to facilitate my review. All opinions are my own.

Oh AppleCheeks! What have you done?!?! I will freely admit that I like my AppleCheeks cloth diapers. I’ve found such a great fit with my size ones on Petit Prince, and I love those ruffles at the legs. But AppleCheeks did something a couple weeks ago, and it has changed EVERYTHING. I went from liking my AppleCheeks diapers to LOVING AppleCheeks. Why did that happen? Two words: ONE SIZE! You can now consider me one those AppleCheeks fans. Send me a keychain, a tea infuser, and a shiny apple tattoo because I am ready! If what I’m saying sounds like crazy talk, then you must have missed the memo! Two weeks ago, AppleCheeks launched their very first one size cloth diaper, and Miranda of Calgary Cloth Diaper Depot asked me to give it a test run for her. Until now, AppleCheeks cloth diapers have been available in three sizes. But now they’ve added an all new one size diaper to their line up. If you’re thinking that a one size diaper from AppleCheeks sounds incredibly redundant given their sized diaper system, then you need to see this diaper. Let me take you on a little tour of this brand new AppleCheeks! Read More

What Rear Facing At Age Four Looks Like

What Rear Facing At Age Four Looks Like

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I’m sure it comes as no surprise that car seat safety is something I’m pretty passionate about. I’ve talked before about the importance of using a car seat correctly in the winter, I’ve covered the hazards of used and expired car seats, and I’ve had a Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST) share her tips for purchasing and installing car seats. If you follow me on Instagram, you’ll have seen that I practice extended rear facing (ERF) with both my boys. When The Heir first graduated from his infant bucket seat to his convertible car seat around 11 months old, I knew I wanted to keep him rear facing as long as possible. Back in those days, I didn’t really know how long that would be. I was hopeful that he’d be able to remain rear facing until age three. I was pretty confident that his convertible car seat would get him there based on his growth chart and the listed weight and height limits of the seat. When The Heir turned three, he still fit quite comfortably rear facing in his convertible car seat. I figured he’d rear face until he maxed out the limits of the seat or he turned four years old, whichever came first. And yet, The Heir turned four a couple of weeks ago, and he’s still rear facing. Why? Because he hasn’t hit the weight or height limit of his seat, he’s still comfortable that way, and it is still safer than forward facing. Let me show you what it really looks like to have a four year old rear facing. It just might surprise you! Read More

Dew Drop Tula Baby Carrier Giveaway!

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Tula Baby Carriers have become wildly popular! Using gorgeous prints and amazing features, it’s no wonder!

Each Tula Ergonomic Baby Carrier:

  • can be used in both front and back carries
  • can be used from 15-45 pounds (toddler carrier is approved for 25-50 lbs)
  • can be used from birth with the use of the revolutionary Tula Infant Insert (not included), and into toddlerhood with Tula Free to Grow Extenders (not included)
  • is easy to use and comfortable
  • provides an ergonomic M-position seat supporting optimal development for baby’s body
  • is easy to care for and machine washable
  • is made by hand from 100% Öko-Tex Standard 100 certified cotton
  • is made with the highest quality Duraflex buckles available
  • includes features such as dual-adjustment straps to allow for the perfect fit, additional leg-opening and shoulder padding, and a large pocket on the contouring hip belt
  • includes a removable hood to support baby’s head while asleep, protect from sun or wind, and allow for comfortable breastfeeding

Have you been wanting to own one? Here’s your chance! One lucky winner will get the chance to win one of these beautiful baby carriers in Dew Drop print. Read More

Folding Flat Diapers: The Airplane Fold

Folding Flat Diapers: The Airplane Fold

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I recently delved into the world of flat diapers for the very first time. If you aren’t familiar with a flat diaper, these are your grandma’s diapers. Not to say that flat diapers aren’t amazing, because they are, but that using flats is a very traditional way of cloth diapering your baby. A flat diaper typically consists of a large single layer of cotton cut into a square. Some flats are more perfectly square than others, and some flats are made of materials other than cotton. In order to turn that single layer into a functional and absorbent diaper, it needs to be folded! And that, my friends, is where flats get a bad rap. For some reason, the thought of folding a seemingly humungous piece of material into something small enough to fit on a baby seems incredibly daunting. At least, it was to me! I haven’t really delved much into origami since I was in middle school. The thought of intricately folding a square into something other than a rectangle was giving me cold sweats. Okay, not really, but I was overwhelmed. Nevertheless, I wouldn’t be much of a cloth diapering blogger if I didn’t try new-to-me diaper styles, so when I had the chance to review a Geffen Baby Fladdle flat diaper a while back, I jumped in with both feet. I learned a few things from that experience. First, it’s okay for a flat fold to be messy. Second, I actually love flat diapers. Yeah, you read that right. I love flat diapers. If you haven’t tried flats, I think you should! You don’t need a ton to get started (I literally only have one), and once you start learning to fold them it’s really easy to do. Rather than inundate you with a whole bunch of flat folds all at once, I’m going to introduce some different flat folds one at a time. Today the fold I’m covering is called the airplane fold.  Read More